My first thought on reading this article by Mark Ritson? Ouch!! 

Then came a feeling of discomfort. Could he be right about all this? Is content marketing really "a load of bollocks"? Or, in the words of Bob Hoffman (whom Ritson quotes), "a meaningless term invented by bullshit artists to add gravitas to mundane marketing activities"?

And then I reached a conclusion of sorts. No, content marketing is not complete twaddle. However, Mark does make some good points. 

But firstly, Mark says that he can't see the difference between content marketing and marketing communications. He adds that all the concepts associated with content marketing sound like something a teenager would coin. Nothing new to see here, in other words. 

Now, I would argue that this comes down to semantics. Language is always changing, so if what was once described by one term is now denoted by another, that doesn't seem to be a problem to me. I mean, I'm in my 20s and I already feel like I'm out of touch with the vernacular of Generation Z. 

But where I do feel that Mark strikes a chord is when he says: "The problem appears to be content marketers who, in a modern version of marketing myopia, seem to think that their reason for existence is to create content, rather than communicate with clients and sell stuff."

This is certainly an issue that plagues content marketing - but, actually, all good content marketers understand that their ultimate aim is to score leads and win customers. Yes, we want to write words that flow together seamlessly; to be creative - but we still have our eyes on the prize. And quality definitely does trump quantity. 

When content marketing doesn't hit its mark, it's not the fault of content marketing per se. Rather, it's a failure to practice the craft correctly. 

Content marketing isn't bollocks. In fact, it's important for the very reason that, today, people want to cut through the bollocks. They don't want to be sold to; they are in the driver's seat when it comes to making a purchase. They want to be sure that a product or service is right for them. 

Keep on creating content, I say.